Trees and shrubs at the northern treeline

by Agata Buchwal, Ylva Sjöberg, Pawel Matulewski Air temperature observations show that the Barents region is currently the most rapidly warming region on the globe. For better understanding how the climate has varied in this region longer back in time and beyond the record of direct observations, we measure the growth rings of trees and […]

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All good things must come to an end…

Time flies when you are having fun, and our two weeks the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) in Cambridge Bay/Iqaluktuuttiaq/ᐃᖃᓗᒃᑑᑦᑎᐊᖅ have flow by. It has been a busy couple of weeks with 110 sampling events collecting drone images, dust and beach sediments, sea and tap water sampling, and biodiversity observations and collections (see the […]

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Beaches, bugs and plastic…

The “Biodiversity and Plastics in Arctic Intertidal and Nearshore Terrestrial Systems” (B-PAINTS) team have completed our first week in Nunavut working at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) in Cambridge Bay/Iqaluktuuttiaq/ᐃᖃᓗᒃᑑᑦᑎᐊᖅ. Time has flown by, and the weather has gone from hot and sunny to colder with 100 km/h winds. We are working on […]

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79 Degrees North

Lunch on a glacier After two hours of hiking, we finally reach Vestre Brøggerbreen. The last hour has been a maze of moraines crisscrossed by braided streams. With every step the loose glacial debris shifts underfoot, requiring complete concentration to avoid tumbling onto boulders. Climbing onto the base of the glacier, I eagerly unload my […]

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Reaching Gerdøya

Weather days We prepared for bad weather. My red, 96-liter L.L.Bean duffel bag brims with fleece jackets, raincoats and extra hats, and my waterproof phone case is rugged enough to allow us to collect samples in the most torrential downpours. But I never imagined while packing for Ny-Ålesund that the biggest threat to our trip […]

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From Cambridge (UK) to Cambridge Bay (Arctic Canada)

The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes, including unprecedented decline in sea ice and rising temperatures. These changes are likely to have significant impacts on all Arctic ecosystems, but beaches are often the places we see these changes first. In addition to these pressures, emerging threats such as plastic and other pollutants are impacting marine life […]

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New season, new bloggers! Part 3

After a nearly two-year break in the “Blogs from the Field”, we are finally able to start a new season of Arctic Research Blogs! This summer, we are delighted to present you with several new blogs from various places in Greenland, Svalbard and Canada. Before the research travel to the field and the make their […]

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Discovering Ny-Ålesund

Life at 78° N Cautiously opening the front door, I make my way down the metal stairs. A quick glance to my sides then I round wide around the corner of the station. At 5:30 in the morning, no one is around. The bright daylight adds to the eerie feeling of desertion. I was told […]

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New season, new bloggers! Part 2

After a nearly two-year break in the “Blogs from the Field”, we are finally able to start a new season of Arctic Research Blogs! This summer, we are delighted to present you with several new blogs from various places in Greenland, Svalbard and Canada. Before the research travel to the field and the make their […]

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Studying stress and genomics in Svanhovd

Greetings from Northern Norway! My name is Sara Lommi and I come from Finland from the University of Jyväskylä where I work as a project researcher in the Stress Genomics group. I have been visiting the beautiful Svanhovd Research Station of the Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO) for two nights to collect malt flies […]

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